Who was Thomas Edison

 
08-31-2005, 09:35 PM
 

i just heard the one about thomas edison being mexican


today at a training about culturally relevant teaching the presenter insisted that thomas alva edison was part mexican.

her reasoning:
1. someone had told her
2. his middle name is "alva"
3. there are schools where mexican-americans attend that are named for him
4. thomas can also be tomas



now it would be great to show this cultural relevance to my students, but this was not quite compelling evidence. i needed documentation. i searched all over google and google scholar and all i got was encarta saying he is dutch and british and another site referring to the legend that he was actually a part-mexican orphan adopted by an american couple.

i just wanted some more backup on this story to reinforce that what we want to be true or politically useful may not be, actually. 1
08-31-2005, 10:43 PM
 
1. Hearsay. Objection sustained.

2. Alva is a common middle name in my family tree on my mother's side and there is no Mexican blood in any of us from what I can tell.

3. Lots of Mexican-Americans attend schools named after Washington, Lincoln, and Roosevelt, I don't believe any of them are Mexican-American.

4. So everyone that has a middle name that easily translates into a Hispanic name is Mexican? Should we now call former presidents Jorge Washington, Ricardo Nixon, and Juan Kennedy?

I say the presenter is whacko. 3
08-31-2005, 11:21 PM
 
thank you!

now unfortunately i must disillusion my fellow teachers. that will be fun. by fun i mean we'll play shoot the messenger and i'll be the messenger. whee. 4
04-15-2014, 07:07 PM
Isaiah 1:15/Screw the NRA
 
It's taking longer than we thought. 6
04-15-2014, 09:15 PM
 
Here is a long discussion among Mexicans, with one lady valiantly struggling to keep the facts straight, (but playing whack-a-mole in the process).

Note that just as Martinez seems to base his story on his own efforts to determine ancestry by perceived bone structure, the various persons in that thread hoping to find a Mexican connection are relying on anecdotes and the resemblance of names and wind up having Edison born in multiple villages, (or even being born in the U.S. to a rich lady fleeing the scandal of an out-of-wedlock pregnancy--although why she would move to Ohio and settle down with a Canadian who already had six kids is never explained). This appears to be a Mexican urban legend that can be safely ignored. 7
04-15-2014, 09:26 PM
 
I heard Beethoven was partly black or at the least, "dark." 8
04-15-2014, 09:32 PM
 
Originally Posted by the_diego
I heard Beethoven was partly black or at the least, "dark."
The Master speaks. 9
04-15-2014, 10:01 PM
 
Holy Moley! That cites an article from The Theosophist!

I'll lay you 8 to 1 that not a single article ever printed in The Theosophist was ever correct.

And it started publication in 1879. 10
04-15-2014, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Western New York
Alva may be a Mexican surname. But it's also a common given name in Germany and Scandinavia. 11
04-16-2014, 01:15 AM
 
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Alva is not a Mexican surname, at least if people can spell. The Hispanic surname is Alba, meaning "white" or "the break of dawn, before sunup". 12
04-16-2014, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
Originally Posted by Nava
Alva is not a Mexican surname, at least if people can spell. The Hispanic surname is Alba, meaning "white" or "the break of dawn, before sunup".
B and V are often interchanged in Spahish, and Spanish speaking people from one region often cannot hear the difference when the sound is spoken by people from another region. Hence, Cordoba/Cordova and numerous other examples. In Central America, the letter of the alphabet, when spelling out words or serial numbers, is often called "B-grande" and "V-chico" in order to distinguish them. 13

Last edited by jtur88; 04-16-2014 at 11:53 AM.
04-16-2014, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Hey! I'm located! WOOOOW!
Originally Posted by jtur88
B and V are often interchanged in Spahish, and Spanish speaking people from one region often cannot hear the difference when the sound is spoken by people from another region. Hence, Cordoba/Cordova and numerous other examples. In Central America, the letter of the alphabet, when spelling out words or serial numbers, is often called "B-grande" and "V-chico" in order to distinguish them.
Two different points:

1) B grande and B chica or B alta and B baja and they haven't been different phonemes except in Argentinian Spanish for quite a while, which would actually add to confusion but see below. Uve chica is akin to ATM machine and letters are all (f), never chicos.

2) Alba is one of those words whose spelling has been fixed since before there was a Spanish language, it's straight from Latin. 15

Last edited by Nava; 04-16-2014 at 12:52 PM.
04-16-2014, 01:07 PM
 
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Regardless, just looking through LinkedIn and searching on "Alva" surname in Mexico maxes out the results (100), so while I'm sure it's not the dominant spelling, it doesn't seem to be all that rare. 16
04-16-2014, 01:25 PM


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